Tag Archives: pbh

David Lee Morgan – The River Was a God: A Review

Bunbury Magazine – 

David Lee Morgan presents an hour of spoken word, a fantastic blend of poetry and soundscapes with a deeply atmospheric feel for the Americana – from the very beginning David’s performance has the ambience of an open-top car-ride against a burnt orange sunset.

This is an hour of poetry about bringing power to the powerless. These are poems about evolution and revolution, beautifully constructed for a balance of depth of imagery and pace of narrative, each one matched with music that adds new layers and sweeps the audience away with David as he explores these themes.

David is a very engaging performer, taking the time to put his messages across both with the poetry itself and in the spaces between. He has a great charm that makes this hard-hitting and risk-taking poetry a safe space in which reflection can take place.

David also performed excerpts from his other show, The Other Side of The Flood, the last performance of which is on 22nd August, at Banshee Labyrinth at 1620. For a great blend of of spoken word, soundscaping and musical theatre, both shows cannot be missed.

Written by Christopher Moriarty

David Lee Morgan – The River Was a God

Banshee Labyrinth, 1620

Part of PBH Free Fringe

4th – 26th August (except Wednesdays)

Isobel Rogers, Jen Wakefield & Kirsty Mann – WIP It: A Review

Bunbury Magazine – 

WIP It sees a rolling roster of Rogers, Wakefield and Mann presenting a half-and-half show of innovative, daring and touching comedy.  On the night in particular that I had the pleasure of this hour of comedy, it was Isobel and Jen taking to the stage, bringing a fantastic blend of character and musical comedy to the stage.

All three are members of the Soho Theatre Young Company and it is easy to see this in their sharp and professional delivery. Rogers presented excerpts from her show ‘Elsa’ (at the Pleasance Dome from 16th – 19th August). Not to give too much away about it, this was an absolutely engrossing and engaging narrative, story-telling of a very high order accompanied by extremely accomplished guitar-playing and singing. The detail and the characterisation in the story of Elsa were top-drawer and, were Bunbury still in Edinburgh, I would not be hesitating to see the full show to see how the whole tale unfolds.

For the second half, Jen Wakefield took to the stage for a music-laced half hour of a completely different variety. Jen talks with passion about a whole range of subjects, speaking from the heart about stereotypes and identities, flipping the conventions with a sharp wit and exceptional jokes. She also brings her years as a primary school teacher to the stage, as well as the cultural relevance of Drake and a fantastic grime tutorial.

For an excellent hour of comedy, this really cannot be missed. It should also be noted that my cousin was there too, and he loved it as well.

Written by Christopher Moriarty.

Isobel Rogers, Jen Wakefield and Kirsty Mann – WIP It

Southsider, 1900

Part of the PBH Free Fringe

4th – 25th August (Rogers 4th – 11th, Wakefield 4th – 25th, Mann 12th – 25th)

Louise Bastock and Liz Guterbock – Sparkle Deli: A Review

Bunbury Magazine – ⭐⭐

Welcome to the Sparkle Deli, where there are plenty of laughs on offer – a wholesale of silly and sinister laughs with a whole heap of sparkle thrown in.

Bastock and Guterbock are yours hosts at the deli, two comedians whose style and comedic themes compliment each other perfectly. This is a show in which Louise and Liz show how we view ourselves and each other through different lenses, trying to rectify the darkness that can be found which recovering from trauma and adversity – Bastock’s weight loss journey and Guterbock’s heartbreak. They have a great ability to bring the light side of these situations – which can often be bleak – and touching on the taboos of these topics while always leaving the audience assured that triumph is just around the corner.

While exploring these themes, Louise and Liz talk about subjects as varied as dating, self-image, tap-dancing, American chocolate and what it is like being an American in the UK. Their jokes have the ability to be cheeky and naughty but never over the line.

Get yourself over to the Sparkle Deli and check out what Bastock and Guterbock are serving up.

Written by Christopher Moriarty.

Louise Bastock and Liz Guterbock – Sparkle Deli

Southsider, 1745. Part of PBH Free Fringe

4th – 25th August (except 14th & 20th)

Rory O’Keeffe – The 37th Question: A Review

Bunbury Magazine – 

Rory O’Keeffe presents the story of Stuart and Zoe, two strangers who complete the psychological experiment the 36 Questions on their first date. This is a well-written story by a comedian and story-teller that has a great ability to draw the audience into the word he has created.

This is a story where the audience chooses the direction, the streets the narrative takes towards the end. Rory is a published writer – having written for the Love Island and X Factor choose-your-own adventure apps. He has brought the structure to a show that has a depth to its subject matter – a story about falling in love, how secrets can spread through a relationship, about keeping relationships together. Rory has a keen eye for detail while painting vivid imagery that helps bring the story alive. The characters are fully-formed and believable, helping in their formation by the use of recordings of their first date, laying a dual past-and-present narrative, which turns according to the decisions the audience make.

The story poses the idea of the 37th Question, moving along at a pace that is never broken as it swaps from then to now. What will the 37th Question be? The audience is never anythigngless than gripped as Rory weaves his words.

Rory is certainly an engaging performer that can craft a thought-provoking story and engage his audience in a funny and charming way.

Written by Christopher Moriarty

Rory O’Keeffe – The 37th Question

Banshee Labyrinth, 1320.

Part of The PBH Free Fringe

4th – 26th August

Our Fringe 2014 – Part One

Here at Bunbury Magazine, we love creativity in all shapes and media. We have featured writing, photography, art and interviews with musicians, playwrights and all sorts of lovely people. We basically try to create a cornucopia of loveliness on-line with each issue. Given this, we thought it was only right that this year we take a trip to Edinburgh for the biggest cornucopia of loveliness in the world – the Fringe and International Arts Festival. According to the Edinburgh Guide, this year there will be “49,497 performances of 3,193 shows in 299 venues across Scotland’s capital city.” How could we miss that?

We couldn’t! So we packed up our suitcase for four days and headed up with our mascot, Pinhead Po.Pinhead Po

Over the next few posts we shall be giving you a round-up of the shows we saw and the hijinks we got up to while we were up at the biggest arts festival in the world. Also, we will be giving awards out to all those deserving and hard-working folks at the Free Fringe!

Ben Target – The Audience Participation Award: As we queued up for Hooray for Ben Target (pronounced Tar-jay), the director asked if anyone could help collect imaginary lemons. We could not pass this up so the three of us hit the streets in search of fruits of the mind. When we arrived back at The Banshee Labyrinth, we were treated to highlights of the show we had come to see and were currently stood outside of. We were eventually let in very quietly by the eponymous Ben who had started crafting an imaginary cake with the help of the audience. The show was filled with silliness and very good-humoured jiggery-pokery as well as a history lesson on Target’s grandfather. This show is definitely not to be missed!

Cormac Friel – The Michael Palin Award: The first thing that struck us about Cormac is just how nice he is. Quite possibly the nicest person we met at the Fringe. In his show at the Jekyll and Hyde, called Alpha Fail, he discusses what it is to be an ‘alpha male’ in today’s world. His stage presence was easy and reassuring which really helped draw the audience into his world. Also, one of the best flyers for a show at the Fringe.

Pierre Hollins – Every Breath You Take Award: We first saw Pierre at Porky the Poet’s Free Fringe show (more on that to follow) where he did a guest spot. The day after, we bumped into him on Niddry Street we he met Po. On the third day, we went to see his show, sat in the front row and stared as he said words. It’s no wonder we were dubbed his first official stalkers! He has been on the circuit for 30 years and his experience shows. He was terrific on the stage, particularly when he broke out his guitar.

Richard Tyrone Jones – Stewart Lee Award and My (Christopher) Best Joke of the Fringe: ‘What The F*ck Is This? One man. One hour. Five words.’ The flyer says exactly what this show does. Richard, in a tweed jacket, boxer shorts, shoes and nothing else says nothing but those five words for an hour. In different orders and different voices, of course. There is an accompanying slide show with increasing bizarre pictures and bags of audience interaction in this manic, patience-testing and ultimately rewarding show. Half the audience had left by the end but they really missed out, especially one beautiful moment where everything was turned on it’s head at the end. Best Joke: The ‘The The/Bruce Forsythe’ joke. Saying anything more would be a huge spoiler!

Wil Hodgson – The Missions and Values Award:  Wil Hodgson’s show is called ‘You Will Be Taken From This Place’ and that is exactly he does. Using a beautifully descriptive and well penned set, he truly does take his audience away on an amazing informative historical journey. He begins this journey by saying that he has been doing comedy and the Fringe for a long time and wanted to try something different; a spoken word show, about the history of capital punishment in Britain, with much of the story based around the hanging of Peter Allen ( hope I got that right, don’t fail me now Wikipedia) It was a fascinating show with parts of humour though comedy was never the main aim of the show. Wil is talking about taking it on tour and we implore him to do so and all of you to get out and see it!

Darren Walsh – The Milton Vine Award: We sadly were not able to make Darren’s pun-filled half-hour though we were drawn to him whilst he was flyering for his show by the board around his neck advertising ‘FREE PUNS.’ Even with the word ‘antidisestablishmentarianism’ he did not disappoint! A full review of his show, ‘Chicken Meow’ will follow in the future.

Christian Reilly – The Aint No Rest For The Wicked/Money Don’t Grow on Trees Award: What do you like in a free show? Do you like comedy? Music? Saving money on seeing Boris Johnson, Lady Gaga and Bon Jovi live? Christian Reilly is a consummate master of taking some of the biggest and hottest topics plaguing society today such as bullying and the food racism of the traffic light system. Beware though, his songs WILL get stuck in your head. Beautifully addictive.

Valdermar Pustelnik – The We’ve Got Fun ‘n’ Games: On our very first day at the Fringe this year, we were sat in a Subway having a spot of breakfast when we saw a man in a Viking hat with a great big ginger beard handing out flyers for a show called ‘My Demons are Bigger then Yours.’ This was a really touching and funny show about one man’s struggle with what it means to really be a man today and whether or not his family need him or he needs them…if only to find his pants! We also find out that you can say pretty much anything you want if you wear an impressive hat. Great delivery and emotion in a well-crafted show.

More to follow. Much, much more!